Andy’s (not so) Angry: The #HossDivision, GFW Tags New Japan, and Stepping Back in the Combat Zone

Hoss Division

It’s been a long time since you could say this in a positive light.  As a WWE fan, it’s hard to remember when it was ever much of a good thing.  But the time is here, the action is good, and I’m excited to finally say this with a straight face.

The Hoss Division is running wild in WWE.

I’m going to preface this by saying I’ve almost always been a workrate guy.  Ever since I was smartened up to the business (or as smartened up as a fan can be, without actually stepping into the ring,) I’ve always been a fan of the guys who busted their ass in the ring, putting on quality matches.  The guys like Bret Hart, Shawn Michaels, Chris Daniels, CM Punk, Daniel Bryan, and Dolph Ziggler?  Those have always been my guys.  They still are, both on TV and the indies.  I probably spent enough on ROH tickets and merch back in the day to prove it.

But I’ve always held a soft spot for capable big guys.  I’m not talking about your big, fat, immobile monsters.  Guys like Viscera, Kurrgan, the Great Khali, Ezekial Jackson, and early-model Mason Ryan are unwatchable to me—and always have been.

The days of those guys seem to be gone.  Need proof?  Check out the main event of Survivor Series – consisting of a bunch of very over, very talented HOSSES.

Let’s start with Team Authority.  You have Luke Harp—excuse me, INTERCONTINENTAL CHAMPION Luke Harper, who may be one of the most underrated big men in recent history, as far as actual wrestling skill goes.  Rusev is a human boulder, and doesn’t trail too far behind Harper in the talent department.  Mark Henry came into his own a few years ago, and has been an amazing talent ever since.  Kane is in the twilight of his career, but still puts on good matches with less-monstrous opponents.  Seth Rollins is the “smallest” guy on this team—and that’s if you can possibly consider 6’1” and shredded “small.”  Hint: you can’t.

Team Cena?  The namesake of the team has always been a physical specimen, and while not huge in height, has long been the king of hosses.  Big Show is self-explanatory, and he BRINGS IT.  It’s been well-established (especially in Raw Regurgitated) that we here love Ryback – an ever-improving big guy who oozes natural charisma and an amazing sense of comedic timing. Erick Rowan is another mountain of a man who remains to be truly tested in individual workrate, but certainly has the potential to succeed.  Dolph Ziggler is the “small” guy in this one, at a miniscule six feet tall.  While not a hoss, he’s indisputably awesome.

Not to mention guys like Randy Orton, Sheamus, Cesaro, Swagger…. Oh yeah, and your WWE Champion, the “one” in 21-and-1, Brock Lesnar.

Bottom line?  WWE is redefining what it means to be a hoss.  It no longer means you’re a generic 6-foot-6 midwestern dude who was recruited out of an amateur wrestling program.  It no longer means that you’ve got the look, without an inkling of natural charisma.  It’s no longer a dirty word.

And as late-era DDP would tell you—that’s not a bad thing. It’s a good thing!